How Salesflare grew to 2000+ users in the ultra-competitive CRM market [Case Study]

How Salesflare grew to 2000+ users in the ultra-competitive CRM market [Case Study]

As you B2B SaaS founders & marketers know, there is one company in the ultra-competitive (600+ CRMs) CRM space that people actually LOVE using – Salesflare.

They aren’t massive like some of their competitors that dominate the CRM market, but the fact that they already have 2000+ users that swear by the app is pretty impressive.

Just read this testimonial and you’ll see what I mean.

Salesflare review

Today, I want to show you how a small Belgian startup called Salesflare is slowly but surely chipping away at the CRM market oligopoly dominated by the giants: Salesforce, Zoho, Hubspot and Pipedrive.

#1 The secret to great marketing

Salesflare marketing

You’ve probably heard the somewhat-vague yet extremely-pertinent advice that the secret to marketing is…….building a great product!

Wise words from Chief Sumo, who knows a thing or two about marketing.

Now, I could just drop that tiny nugget of value and end this article right here.  

But my hope with this piece is to leave you with some actionable advice that you can use to build or improve your own product & marketing.  

These days, this advice might seem like a no-brainer to more advanced marketers, but it doesn’t seem to have sunk in to the masses considering the amount of people still trying to sell crappy products.

What this statement definitely doesn’t mean, is building a great product guarantees customers. I’ve seen great products with terrible marketing that have ultimately flopped.

What it does mean is that building a great product for your customers makes marketing the product a lot more genuine. And a lot more enjoyable, which is key in giving you the motivation to keep pushing. 

Your marketing can be purely focused on building relationships with people in the outside world, over-providing them value and understanding their problems and pain points so that you can solve them with your product.

Building a product that you want and love allows you to play the “longer game” as Salesflare co-founder & CEO, Jeroen Corthout, puts it. If you have a great product, you don’t need to be as aggressive with your marketing.

#2 Don’t find customers for your products: find products for your customers

Although the cloud is still in its infancy, the times are different and it’s difficult to stand out just by building a great product. 

At this stage in the development of the SaaS space, it’s pretty obvious that you need to build products directly catered to the needs of your customers. 

But for the sake of clarity, what this means is you need to start by scratching your own itch – build a product you want/need and be solving your own problems. 

Jeroen and his co-founder Lieven Janssen built Salesflare because they weren’t satisfied with any other CRM on the market. Manually inputting data in order to keep it up to date wasn’t going to cut it.

Out of hatred for doing robotic, repetitive tasks they thought of a solution to solve their own pain points – an automated, intuitive CRM with seamless integration features. How every great product is born!

Salesflare is the embodiment of simple software. But it’s also extremely powerful. And you’re instantly aware of this as soon as you log in. 

As Salesflare grows and adds new product features to satisfy the needs of its users, it has become more and more powerful. 

I created this graph comparing key features of 4 core players in CRM software space to demonstrate Salesflares core features in comparison with their competitors. 

salesflare vs pipedrive

Sometimes, adding product features and increasing the power of a product means more complexity. But Salesflare has managed to add depth without adding unnecessary complexity. 

A while back, Jeroen was relatively secretive about Salesflare’s size in a Latka interview. When I questioned him about their current user base, he didn’t give me any specific numbers either. 

In the Latka interview, he mentioned that if he were to disclose the exact numbers Salesflare would seem small compared to their competitors. 

But users love smaller companies. And it’s pretty clear why. They can bend and cater to the needs of their customers. It’s clear that Salesflare is growing and that it has a development roadmap with upgrades 

that will cater to the needs of their users.

In fact, every month, Salesflare adds 2 new “loveable features” to grow their product. There’s two key takeaways I want to break down here:


Key Takeaway

  1. Create a product that you/people love using and consistently add features that make the product even more loveable.

  2. BEND AND CATER TO THE NEEDS OF YOUR USERS EARLY ON.

  3. ADD DEPTH WITHOUT ADDING NECESSARY COMPLEXITY

#3 Build habits and turn these into centralized processes early on

So far, the advice I’ve given here has been primarily theoretical. The point of this piece is to hopefully leave you with some tactical advice, so let’s get into the meat of it.

Forming habits around your goals is the only way to make incremental progress. The same goes for consistently delivering value in your product, your marketing and your community. 

Building processes and centralizing them to be able to keep track of everything early on is essential to the growth of your business.

Salesflare’s goals to consistently deliver value every month are:

  • 2 loveable features per month
  • 1 onboarding improvement
  • 1 high value article that brings search traffic
  • 2 valuable contributions outside of their own audience (to podcasts, events, webinars, articles, …)

How do the team at Salesflare plan, prioritize, experiment and keep track of all their monthly goals?

They’ve created a sheet with the different habits as rows and the months as columns.

salesflare crm

For every habit, they have a slightly different process for coming up with good ideas, scoping them and implementing them.

However, they all come together in a big overview in the sheet, which shows the entire team what they’re doing to make progress in one view.

Let’s breakdown the processes the team at Salesflare have in place in order to prioritize new product features based on their product roadmap and user feedback.

The team at Salesflare tracks everything customers ask closely including what they asked, who asked and what it’s related to. They then combine the most frequently requested/asked things with their “vision and gut feeling.” 

What is Salesflare’s vision? “A world in which salespeople can focus on customers. Completely.” 

I’m sure virtually all sales people and Salesflare users would agree that this is a vision worthy of pursuing. 

And if their users needs fall in line with this vision and it is technically possible, Salesflare will make it happen. 

Every two weeks, they sit with the product team to discuss upcoming features. The features get chosen, scoped, and planned in to hand over to the development team. 


Key Takeaway

  1. Prioritize the activities that jack up the growth dials in your business most and build monthly habits and processes around these early on

  2. Track EVERYTHING your customers ask and combine this with your vision/product roadmap to grow your product with loveable features

#4 Focus your marketing around one growth metric that matters most

Salesflare marketing

We hear about the importance of setting goals all the time. But we don’t hear about how to track goals correctly nearly as often. 

It’s easy to set multiple goals for business growth. It’s much harder to ruthlessly prioritise, track and focus on one goal for a defined period of time (e.g. a year). But the most effective strategy for growth is picking one growth metric that ACTUALLY moves the needle most in your business and sticking to it. 

Most company dashboards are confusing. They have too many goals. They’re tracked in spreadsheets kept by heads of marketing, as opposed to having them centralized. This inevitably leads to difficulties with oversight, loss of information and  transfer of knowledge. 

How does the team at Salesflare set specific growth metrics and track them?

  1. They pick a specific growth metric to improve, e.g. increase conversion of traffic to trials
  2. Everyone on the growth team brainstorms ideas and shares them in one place
  3. They go through them together and explain why and how
  4. They score the ideas by impact and cost/effort
  5. They select the ones with high impact and low cost/effort
  6. They make a quarterly planning that is achievable
  7. Further operational planning happens during their biweekly “growth meetings”

“We use a Google Doc/Sheet, but when we make a step up with this, we could start using ROIplan.”

The fact that they don’t use a tool is impressive in and of itself. How do they keep track of everything, prevent loss of information and ensure seamless transfer of knowledge? 

As your business grows, managing your processes on the product and marketing side becomes more complex. Like Jeroen, I too wonder whether or not this will be possible in the long term. 

On the marketing side, a tool like ROIplan allows you to create, manage and control all your marketing plans, campaigns and experiments in one place.. 

If excel spreadsheets aren’t cutting it anymore and you want to have a centralized overview of all your marketing efforts for your entire team, check ROIplan out!


Key Takeaway

  1. Focus on one growth metric that matters for a defined time period and use a ROIPlan to manage your marketing efforts around your growth metric

#5 Habitually fine-tune your onboarding experience to consistently guide users to their ‘Aha’ moment

One of the habits that Salesflare has built to consistently deliver value is a monthly onboarding improvement. Currently, the conversion rate from free trials to paid is around 10%. I couldn’t find any  reliable, current industry averages, but this seems like a pretty solid conversion rate. Especially considering many people go shopping for CRMs by starting trials on a whole series of them, before actually trying a shortlist in detail.

It doesn’t seem like Jeroen is satisfied. He’s convinced that the onboarding improvement the team will deliver this month is going to bring that number up significantly. I can’t tell you what it’s going to be, but it will be focused on better activating free trials (which Salesflare already does very well). 

Unfortunately, we can’t go through a timeline of all the incremental improvements. But thankfully Jeroen shed some light on one of the biggest improvements and how they came to it. 

By watching Hotjar videos, the team at Salesflare noticed that users weren’t consistently going through the ‘aha’ moment. So they ‘designed their walk-through to guide them through those while explaining what happens and how it works.’

By breaking down their entire onboarding experience from the landing page to the product tour, my hope is to give you some tactical advice that you can use to improve your product’s onboarding experience. 

When it comes to onboarding, the experience always needs to be aligned with demonstrating value upfront from the first interaction. 

Salesflare’s landing page has a strong value proposition with a CTA to sign up for free.

  1. The headline puts emphasis on their main value proposition and the #1 pain point of their customers. 
  2. The sub-heading reiterates the value proposition and calls out the primary target audience – small B2B businesses. 
  3. A strong call to action with contrasting colour to push people to act.
  4. Another CTA 
  5. A demonstration of the beautiful UI & compatibility with mobile to let people know they can run their entire CRM from a phone (Salesflare offers all functionality on mobile too, even sending email campaigns, which you won’t find anywhere else). 

 

They also have a pretty neat alternative landing page targeting people who are on the fence or looking to switch from their main competitor – Pipedrive. And, yes, they are running Google ads on the keywords “pipedrive alternative.”

  1. Relevant headline for people looking to switch from Pipedrive and strong value proposition.
  2. Social proof that creates intrigue for why user ratings for Salesflare are higher
  3. Strong CTA that pushes people to take Salesflare for a spin and “find out why”

As soon as you sign up for Salesflare, the primary value proposition is made clear – focus on what matters by automating robotic, manually-intensive tasks.

You’re guided through these three slides which explain what Salesflare will do for you – automate your  input data while still giving you full control and help you do more of what’s working. 

Now, what’s truly great about the onboarding experience is the product tour – taking Salesflare ‘for a spin.’.

The re-iteration of their primary value proposition and the use of emojis is effective because it’s personable, relatable and fresh. 

At this point, you basically have no option but to take it for a spin. 

Apart from the fact that you’re instantly aware of the beautiful UI, Salesflare excels at demonstrating value up-front and activating their users

salesflare contact enrichment

Users are instantly pushed for activation by accepting the suggested contact. This helps Salesflare show value the minute the user lands on the main product UI as they instantly start seeing the power of the CRM in real-time.

Virtually all CRMs are empty until you start manually inputting data. Most users aren’t actually using the software or creating anything during the free trial – they’re just having a passive look. 

Salesflare takes full advantage of this and uses these empty states to natively push for user action and allow you to tangibly grasp the power of the tool. This is where users get their first ‘aha’ moment. 

I haven’t included screenshots from the rest of the product tour, but as you progress through it, it’s designed to consistently guide you through ‘aha’ moments. 

Why did the team at Salesflare choose not to play with human psychology and use a checklist? I don’t know the answer to this, but I think it makes sense for two reasons:

  1. Going through an entire checklist might seem too time-consuming/daunting for users as opposed to the short product tour which delivers just as much value
  2. To differentiate the onboarding experience from Pipedrive

 

Obviously, every SaaS product is unique. What works for Salesflare might not work for your product. Your product might be more complex. It might not be as easy to demonstrate it’s full power up-front.  

But you can always adopt some of the key takeaways here for your own onboarding experience: 

  • Have a simple, clear landing page with strong value proposition and CTA
  • Set up alternative landing pages for relevant traffic
  • Re-iterate your value proposition by explaining and then demonstrating your software in real-time
  • Take advantage of empty states to natively push for user action
  • Build in habits for incremental improvements to consistently get users to ‘their Aha’ moment ASAP 

#6 Drive action using the sexy number 3 in your autoresponders

I love a good auto-responder. Marketers started using them the same year I was born – 1995. There’s nothing new about them, but you should constantly be re-doing and improving them. 

If someone’s signed up for something, they clearly want more from you. Try to figure out what the 3 most valuable things you can point your user to are.  

Why 3? I noticed that a lot of great marketers point subscribers to 3 things / 3 points of action. Not sure why Tim Feriss’ weekly newsletter is called 5 bullet friday…amateur.

Salesflare exploits the alluring 3’s in their sequence quite a bit in their 7 step onboarding email sequence. 

They use it in their welcome email shown below, in the 2nd email (which is their top performing email in the sequence), as well as the 3rd and 4th emails. 

Salesflare onboarding

The welcome email is short & concise. It reiterates their primary value proposition in the first sentence. It provides you with two options on how to get started and gives you 3 different ways to get in touch. 

I particularly like the fact that you can reply straight to the email. It gives it a human touch despite the fact that it’s an autoresponder. It also creates less friction and gives you confidence in the support being informative and highly responsive. 

The 2nd email in the sequence is Salesflare’s best performing email. It’s also structured in 3’s – “Three Ways.”

Many people who trial Salesflare are just taking it for a spin to see if they should switch CRM. Most aren’t ready to make the switch instantly and end up just clicking around in the trial without creating anything – they’re just having a passive look at the software. 

For Salesflare, only 40% of trials go beyond this passive state. Around 50% of those really use the software and about 50% of those actually sign up. 

The intention behind the 3rd email is to push passive users and activate them so that they can really grasp what Salesflare can do for them.

What makes this email work?

  • The subject line is clear, direct and focused on the recipient
  • The 3 point action list drives action
  • The emphasis on ease (not being a huge time suck)
  • The short video with Jeroen that actually demonstrates ease of use

The email below is only sent to people who have been primarily passive and haven’t done much with Salesflare during their trial.

Salesflare trial

What makes this email work?

  • The copy is focused entirely on the users experience
  • The emphasis on the extension 

 

A trial extension can be an indicator that there’s a deeper problem, and the request is a symptom of that problem. If you can’t show the value of your product during the trial, you might need to re-think that. Asking users to specify a reason allows you to understand why they need it so that you can incorporate that learning to improve the trial process. 

This isn’t the case with Salesflare, as the issue is largely passive users who don’t actually do anything during the trial. Salesflare’s trial is short but you can definitely maximize its value within the trial period. 


Key Takeaway

  1. Point your users to 3 things / 3 action points to activate them

  2. Create an onboarding sequence that automatically adapts based on how far people already got in their onboarding

#7 Build and launch a free tool on Product Hunt and use referral marketing to promote it

Salesflare’s signature tool was the first free tool that they launched on Product Hunt. By pulling data from your contacts’ email signatures, the tool adds everyone you receive emails from to your Google Contacts automatically. 

Aside from being a super helpful tool (that landed #3 Product of the Day) for people whose contact list is a mess (like myself, and Product Hunt’s founder in the screenshot below), it’s a great example of how to create a tool around your core product that works well for lead generation. 

Now, creating tools has been a popular lead gen strategy since 2017 (and maybe even earlier), but it’s working better in 2020 than it ever has. 

Aside from the helpful tool they built, Salesflare’s Signature Tool launch on Product Hunt was successful because of the referral marketing they used.

To get access to the tool, people had to sign up to a waiting list. By referring to three people, all four could skip the waiting list and get instant access to the tool. 

They also created an additional layer of incentives with a bonus feature available in the Signature tool for users who referred 3 additional people.

Salesflare launched the tool almost 2 years ago and it’s since been built into their core product, but it still continues to drive referral traffic to their website today.

In fact, Product Hunt is one of Salesflare’s top referring sites because of the numerous successful launches they’ve had so far, including an ebook on salestheir podcast with foundersa sales funnel template, the Signature tool and of course, not in the least, their core product. 

 Product Hunt launches can drive a ton of new users to your product in the early stages if you do it right. But you really need to have some value bombs to make it work. 

I won’t bother developing on how to go about a Product Hunt launch because Salesflare has the ultimate piece on how to launch on Product Hunt, which adds more value than I could on the matter.


Key Takeaway

  1. Don’t limit yourself to only launching your core product on Product Hunt. Free tools and value packed resources are great for lead generation and much harder for other people to copy. 

What free tool can you create around your core product to build lead generation into your product? 

#8 OWN the only channel you truly own & create a world class customer experience & support

The most successful businesses no longer sell products. They sell experiences. 

Now, there is a lot of overlap between CX and UX, but CX takes a more holistic view of all the interactions a user has with a brand. This means every area of your business will impact the experience a customer

has with your brand. 

From online ads, to sales reps to customer service – all of these impact the customer experience.

These days, having a great product with great services is foundational for any SaaS business – it’s the norm. You need to go beyond to really stand out. The entire experience & support needs to be world class. 

I would argue that in this increasingly robotic & automated era, humanizing the experience is one of the heaviest weighing factors in whether a potential customer will choose your over a competitor.

Can you think of any tech startups post early stage that give you direct access to the founder for customer service? 

There aren’t many. But Jeroen and the team at Salesflare are always highly responsive and informative. 

Just read this review from a user who compared Zoho, Hubspot, Pipedrive & Salesflare in parallel:

Point-in-case.

Building a great product isn’t enough. The entire customer experience needs to be world class. And this is something that Salesflare excels at. 

It was difficult to find testimonials apart from the ones on Product Hunt, but just look at the comments Salesflare fanboys write to grasp the response that true world class customer experience reaps.

Jeroens philosophy on customer success is super straightforward and simple; “try to be as helpful as possible.” 

What exactly does that entail for Salesflare?

“Offering help for anything, from figuring out how to best get set up with customer data (what to organize in which custom fields, which pipeline stages to use, how many pipeline to use, …) and integrations, assisting with imports, advising on sales and so on.”


Key Takeaway

  1. A great product and customer support are foundational. You need to truly offer a world class customer experience and support to stand out.

#9 Build an inbound marketing machine with less, higher quality content

Salesflare’s blog is one of their most powerful marketing assets.

When you think of a company that has a monster inbound marketing machine you probably think of Hubspot. To call Salesflare’s blog an inbound marketing machine may be a slight overstatement. 

But it’s quality over quantity, amirite?

Perhaps Gary V wouldn’t agree, but I always argue for less content. Less content for more qualified traffic and leads. The commitment should be to produce content of high value. And that’s exactly what Salesfare has done by building in a habit of producing at least 1 high value article monthly.

The Ahrefs analysis below shows Salesflares top performing posts on their blog in regards to traffic. However, it doesn’t accurately show Salesflares best performing posts in terms of conversions. Jeroen refused to share these for reasons that I can absolutely respect.

But the top performing posts may very well be any of these 10. I’ve categorized them by “type’ of post so that you can experiment with these formats. 

Blog posts that work:

  • Tool recommendations (e.g. best business card scanner apps) for related apps or for your features
  • Book/podcast/event recommendations focused on your target audience e.g. top startup founder podcasts
  • High level funding advice for founders e.g. top startup accelerators 
  • Scripts & templates e.g. outreach email and cold calling script / sales pipeline template
  • Educational content related to people’s goals with your software for beginners / intermediate users e.g. what’s a sales pipeline?

Let’s breakdown one resource recommendation and one template type post from Salesflare’s blog. 

Everybody likes a good recommendation from people they trust. That’s why so many weekly newsletters that recommend cool new products, tools and trends work. 

Salesflare nailed the sales books recommendations article. The headline “The 20 best sales books Elon Musk is probably reading” is slightly click-baity but it piques your interest to click. 

A book recommendation article seems like a pretty dry subject, but the introduction is actually pretty funny. And the article actually has substance. Apart from the solid book recommendations, it contains mini summaries and calls out the relevant target reader and why they should read it.

Establishing a knowledge hub with educational resources that target all levels of your target audience is crucial for any SaaS business. You need to educate your potential customers and your user base. 

The post shown below is targeted at beginners/intermediate sales people, but can also serve as an important refresher for people that are more advanced.

This post has a content upgrade that is a sales pipeline template. Templates work because instead of just educating your reader with a blog post, you’re actually giving them something that is highly actionable. Aside from being a great lead magnet, it also takes more work for other people to copy.

The quantity of Salesflare’s backlinks is a testament (3.1K) to the quality of the content they put out. To put this into context, Pipedrive’s blog has over 4X the amount of traffic but slightly less backlinks. 

And I’m not overlooking the quality of the backlinks as both have solid referring domains.

In regards to their overall content strategy, Salesflare is playing the long-term game. They know that people looking to switch CRM aren’t going to do so right away, so they aren’t as aggressive with content upgrades and gated content to capture leads. And if they use them, they are highly relevant to the content.

Salesflare’s other content marketing assets include their podcast episodes and contributions outside of their audience. These don’t necessarily generate much traffic for Salesflare, but they “help get the word out and give people a first encounter with Salesflare” according to Jeroen. 

My Thoughts: 

  • Be more aggressive with capturing leads. Your content upgrades don’t need to be bible sized ebooks. They can be a short checklist. The point is they need to be hyper relevant to the article.
  • Experiment with content upgrades placed in the beginning, middle and end of the article.


Key Takeaway

  1. Experiment with different article types and stick to the ones that work

  2. Highly actionable resources like templates still work better than ever for lead generation

#10 Use these channels to distribute your content

Best distribution channels Salesflare has in order of priority:

  1. Google organic searches
  2. Facebook ads (sponsoring the posts)
  3. LinkedIn posts (Posting from personal LI)
  4. Email newsletter
  5. Podcast

Organic search traffic

What has worked best for Salesflare in generating traffic is posts that consistently get search traffic.

Salesflare ranks for ~26k organic keywords on the first 100 results on Google. Many of these don’t rank on the first page, but some of the keywords related to their highly actionable content (e.g. sales funnel template) do rank on the first page of the big G.

They are also spending a small amount each month on paid search ads targeting ~100 PPC keywords. Most of their paid search ad strategy is advertising against their primary competitors, Pipedrive and HubSpot.

Facebook ads

Running paid ads to distribute organic content isn’t new. It’s the norm – If you aren’t putting $ behind your content, you’re losing to the people who are. 

Consistent FB ads running against your content is great to target relevant readers, but ultimately you’re aiming for traffic through Google. 

Salesflare currently has 43 active ads running against their content. They have ads that have been active since August 2018. Most of these ads are retargeting people that have gotten in touch with Salesflare via their blog, their pricing page or onboarding. 

The screenshot below is one of Salesflare’s best performing ads in terms of generating trials. It’s an explainer video that is a retargeting ad to their pricing page and blog.

I asked Jeroen to shed some light on the budget that Salesflare is putting behind these ads. He didn’t disclose any numbers, but it’s “currently not much.” 

LinkedIN

Everyone’s hustling on LinkedIn. It’s like Facebook before organic reach died. People are posting status updates like people used to on Facebook.

Dave Gerhardt (former VP of Marketing at Drift) posts his $0.02 formatted as a short, punchy sentence everyday. Sometimes multipIe times a day. I wonder if posting everyday is actually necessary. It sure seems to be working for Dave, but he has a strong personal brand and ~40k followers. 

At 18K followers, Jeroen is nearly halfway there. But his personal profile isn’t nearly as active despite the fact that everytime Salesflare gets a new trial user, Jeroen automatically connects with them on LinkedIn.. 

Salesflare doesn’t really have a LinkedIn strategy. It’s primarily just Jeroen sharing the latest podcast episodes, Founders Coffee and some of the content on Salesflare’s blog. 

If you want to get the most out of LinkedIn, you need to be able to tell engaging stories or drop golden nuggets of wisdom in your niche. Check out this article from the smart people at Lempire to own LinkedIn.

Email Newsletter

The best distribution comes from building an audience that loves your newsletter. For the most part, it’s one of the most effective ways to directly communicate to your audience. 

Salesflare has ~5K subscribers and sends out a biweekly newsletter. They have above average engagement rates, which according to the industry averages in the SaaS space by Campaign Monitor are around ~17%. 

What do Salesflare’s newsletters include?

  • Latest blog posts including a selection of related posts
  • Latest features
  • Other stuff

The size of the list isn’t as important as the active audience number, which looks at how many people have made recent engagements like opens and click throughs. Focus on these core metrics and keep your active audience number up by sending your inactive subscribers emails they can look forward to in order to reactivate them. 

 

I have no data on Salesflare’s active audience number, but I know they don’t segment their email list according to active subscribers. 

 

Podcast

For Salesflare, the goal of the podcast (Founders Coffee) is to get visibility with the guests network & to get to know the guests and their community. The episodes are also value packed, inspiring stories that readers enjoy. 


Key Takeaway

  1. Focus on Google search traffic

  2. Run retargeting ads against your content

  3. Automatically connect with your users on LinkedIn & share golden nuggets of wisdom related to your industry

  4. Focus on your active audience & work on reactivating your subscribers

  5. Create a podcast to expand your network with guests you want to meet and get visibility from their network 

#11 Contribute outside of your online community

Remember one of Salesflare’s monthly habits I mentioned in section #3 of this article? 

The team at Salesflare has a commitment to make 2 contributions outside of their community every month. Now, this doesn’t necessarily mean exclusively focusing on offline events like meetups, free trainings, medium/larger sized events & conferences. It also includes webinars, podcasts and articles. 

However, I’d like to emphasize offline events & meetups because everyones competing to build their community online and few are contributing outside of their community.   

Sharing your experiences and learnings outside of your direct community helps you get out of your echo chamber and reach enlightenment. The offline world is also the best place to connect with new people as well as your online users, friends, etc. 

What can you be doing offline to add value to your community? 


Key Takeaway

  1. Don’t focus exclusively on your online community. Contribute value offline & outside of your direct community

Summary Key Takeaways 


  • Create a product that people love using and consistently add features that make the product even more loveable.
  • Bend and cater to the needs of your users early on.
  • Point your users to maximum 3 things / 3 action points to activate them
  • Create an onboarding sequence that automatically adapts based on how far people already got in their onboarding
  • A great product and customer support are foundational. You need to truly offer a world class customer experience and support to stand out.
  • Don’t focus exclusively on your online community. Contribute value offline & outside of your direct community
  • Prioritize the activities that jack up the growth dials in your business most and build monthly habits and processes around these early on.
  • Focus on one growth metric that matters for a defined time period and use ROIPlan to manage your marketing efforts around your growth metric
  • Don’t limit yourself to only launching your core product on Product Hunt. Free tools and value packed resources are great for lead generation and much harder for other people to copy. 
  • Experiment with different article types and stick to the ones that work
  • Highly actionable resources like templates still work better than ever for lead generation
  •  Have a simple, clear landing page with strong value proposition and CTA
  • Set up alternative landing pages for relevant traffic
  • Re-iterate your value proposition by explaining and then demonstrating your software in real-time
  • Take advantage of empty states to natively push for user action
  • Build in habits for incremental improvements to consistently get users to ‘their Aha’ moment ASAP
  • Focus on Google search traffic
  • Run retargeting ads against your content
  • Automatically connect with your users on LinkedIn & share golden nuggets of wisdom related to your industry
  • Focus on your active audience & work on reactivating your subscribers
  • Create a podcast to expand your network with guests you want to meet and get visibility from their network 

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